Ordinary of Newgate Prison:
Ordinary's Accounts: Biographies of Executed Convicts

10th March 1714

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10th March 1714


lately been whipt for a Felony he was then convicted of; which he was forc'd to acknowledge, saying, that the keeping of bad Company had heretofore been the Occasion of his committing many Sins, and now proved his Ruin. I perceiv'd his Friends had given him good Education, and I hope it was not quite lost upon him; for it dispos'd him so much the better to understand the Things of Religion that were laid before him, and to apply himself to the Practice of them, while under this Condemnation. Yet I cannot say, that he made at first so good use of his time as he might have, and I wish he had done.

9. Samuel Denny< no role > , alias Appleby< no role > , condemn'd for stealing a Gelding from Mr. John Scagg< no role > , and robbing him of 27 s. in Money, on the Queen's Highway, the 31st of January last . He said, That he was 23 years of age, born at Braintree in Essex , and a Wheelwright by his Trade; but had served four years as a private Sentinel in the Army . He own'd the Fact he was to die for, (which he said was the first he ever committed) and pray'd God to forgive him, both that and all other his Sins, and give him Grace so to repent that he might be saved. By what I could all-along observe in him, or get from him, I found he had not been a greater Offender than now he appear'd a Penitent: And therefore, at his earnest Desire, I administer'd the Holy Sacrament to him yesterday: Which I also did, at the same time, to the Three last mention'd, viz. Christopher Dickson< no role > , John Gibson< no role > , and Alexander Petre< no role > ; whose Behaviour, from first to last, was (to the best of my Observation) such as became true Penitents.

10. John Winteringham< no role > , condemn'd for stealing a Gold-Watch, a Perruke, some Linnen and Apparel out of his Master (Thomas Wynn< no role > Esq; ) his Lodgings, and some Plate from Mr. James Montjoy< no role > , the Landlord of the House where his said Master lodg'd. He own'd himself Guilty of this Fact; but said he never committed the like before; and that he had been (at times) a Servant to other Gentlemen before he came to live with Mr. Wynn, and never wrong'd them to the value of a Farthing; and that being brought up to no Trade, he had for the most part of his Life been a Domestick-Servant in several worthy Families, both in the Country and in London . He said he was but 25 years of age, born at Pomfret (or rather Pontefract) in Yorkshire , and little thought once he should ever come to end his Life in this shameful manner, which (however) he could not but acknowledge was what he had wilfully brought upon himself, and did highly deserve. It seems he was the first Person condemn'd upon the Act lately made against such wicked Servants as rob their Masters. Which I hope will be an effectual Warning to others, so as to teach them to be wiser and more just.

11. Christopher Moor< no role > , condemn'd for Burglary in Breaking open the House of Mr. Thomas Wright< no role > , and taking thence a pair of Silver-Branches, 8 Tea-Spoons, 2 Tea-Pots, a Lamp, and a large quantity of other Plate, on the 13th of February last . He said, he was but 20 years of age, born in the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields ; That for the most part of his Life, he had been a Servant in some Victualling-Houses in and about London , had lived a very loose Life, and done many ill things, besides the Fact he was condemn'd for, which he confess'd; but would give no particular Account of any thing else he had been guilty of, nor discover where the Plate he had stoln might be found, that the right Owner of it might have it again: And when I press'd him to make such Discovery, if he could, he did not so much alledge his Incapacity, as he plainly shew'd his Unwillingness of doing it; saying, that tho' he could do it, yet he would make no such Discovery, if he were sure he should be damned for it: So desparately wicked he then shew'd himself to be, on whom no Admonitions could at first prevail: But I hope he did at last come to understand better Things. And yet this I must say of him, That his Obstinacy in Iniquity, and Impudent Behaviour towards myself and others, were such, as I never met with the like in any of the Malefactors, whom I have had under my Cure for almost these 14 years I have been in this melancholy and difficult Office. When he saw that he must certainly die, then he remembred what I had told him of another World, and of our necessary Preparation for it. Now he seem'd to be willing to do something to clear his Conscience, and save his Soul; giving attention to my Admonitions, and the Information desir'd of him about the Plate he had stoln. And here (among other things) he told me, That about a Month ago, at Night, he robb'd a House in Grey-Fryars , near Christ-Hospital , by lifting up the Sash-Window, and entring the Parlour, and taking from thence 6 Silver Tea-Spoons and a Strainer, with a Silk-Handkerchief Ell-wide, which he sold for 3 s. tho' it was worth more: And that as for the Plate, he sold it with a larger Parcel (amounting to 100 ounces) for 4 s. per ounce. And further, he said, that he had wrong'd Mr. Johnson, a Working Silver-Smith, and begg'd his Pardon (before me) for his having (about 18 Months ago) falsly sworn against him, That he the said Mr. Johnson had bought of him and Roderick Awdry< no role >This name instance is in set 1425 , some Plate, which they had stoln out of my Lady Edwin's House; praying God to forgive him such his Perjury, which I endeavour'd to make him sensible was a most heinous Crime.

12. Daniel Hughes< no role > , condemn'd for the Fact last mention'd, in which he was concerned with Christopher Moor< no role > , and own'd he was so. He said, he was about 16 years of age, born at Gravesend in Kent , and brought up to the Sea , and that he had been a very loose young Man, addicted to many Vices. He was very stupid, foolish and unconcern'd, and gave no great Signs of his Penitence for his Offences against God and his Neighbour, nor of the Punishment he deserved for them, both in this World, and in the next, till he came within the Borders of Death.

At the Place of Execution, to which they were this Day carry'd from Newgate , in four Carts, I attended them for the last time, and endeavour'd to perswade them (who had lived such vicious Lives) throughly to clear their Consciences, and strive to obtain God's Grace, to make a good End in this World, that they might be received into that State of Bliss and Glory in the next, which shall have no end. To this purpose I earnestly spoke to them, and pray'd for them. Then I made them rehearse the Apostles Creed, and sung some Penitential Psalms with them; and finally having recommended their Souls to God, I withdrew from them; leaving them to their private Devotions, for which they had some little time allow'd them. And after that, the Cart drawing away, they were turn'd off: all of them bitterly crying unto God to have Mercy upon their departing Souls.

Before they were turn'd off, I thought (as I exhorted them) that some of them should make a further Confession, but they did not: Only those that had been rude to me, and threaten'd my Life, begg'd my Pardon, and thank'd me for the Pains I took for their Souls: And all of them declar'd that they dy'd in Charity with all the World.

This is all the Account here to be given of these Dying Malefactors, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN< no role > , Ordinary .

Wednesday, Mar. 10. 1713-14 .

London Printed, and are to be Sold by J. Morphew near Stationers-hall.

Just Publish'd, The Third Edition of the 1st and 2d Volumes of the History of Highwaymen, Footpad, &c. And next Week will be publish'd a 3d Volume, continued to this last Sessions.




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